NEW & UPDATED Canada’s Food Guide

I am so EXCITED about the new updated Canada’s Food Guide!
Finally, it makes sense. LOVE that there is a bigger focus on plant-based foods, more water and that dairy is out. It puts a greater focus on what, when and how we eat, vs on food groups and servings.

If you are concerned about not getting your necessary calcium intake, check out these few examples:

Cow-Dairy Sources of Calcium:
*Milk (1cup) = 315 mg
*Cheese (1oz) = 130-200 mg
*Cottage cheese (4oz) =100 mg
*Plain yogourt (½ cup) = 200g

Non-Dairy Sources of Calcium
Rice milk (1cup) = 300 mg
Almonds (½cup) = 300 mg
Sesame seeds (1/8cup) = 275 mg
Tofu (1cup) = 258 mg
Almond butter (3oz) = 225 mg

Other sources of calcium:
• Vegetables (artichoke, asparagus, avocado, beans, broccoli, cabbage, carrot, collard greens, kale, okra, parsley, peas, spinach, swiss chard, turnip greens, watercress)
• Nut butters (cashew butter, tahini, all-natural peanut butter, sunflower seed butter)
• Beans and Rice (brown rice, chick peas, kidney beans, navy benas, pinto beans, wild rice)
• Seaweed (Agar, Irish moss, kelp, wake)

Happy eating!
https://food-guide.canada.ca

Tips to Stay Healthy during the Holiday Season

5 Tips to Stay Healthy During the Holiday Season
You don’t need to deprive yourself or eat only boring foods. Instead, by practicing a mindful approach to eating and cooking, you can come through the holidays without making “go on a diet” one of your New Year’s resolutions.

1. Cook healthy foods – be creative with recipes that use less butter, cream, vegetable shortening, and other ingredients rich in saturated fats and cholesterol. Check out: http://onceuponachef.com for some great ideas.

2. Avoid shopping or heading out to a get-together on an empty stomach. Have a healthy snack before you leave such as raw veggies and hummus, apple slices dipped in natural almond or peanut butter. You will be less likely to crash and overeat.

3. At parties, don’t stand next to the buffet table. If you know you are prone to recreational eating, pop a mint or a stick of gum so you won’t keep reaching for the sweet treats!

4. When serving your plate, ensure ½ your plate is loaded with vegetables. You can also use a smaller size plate, that way, you will control the amount of food.

5. Avoid alcohol on an empty stomach. Alcohol increases your appetite and diminishes your ability to control what you eat. A glass of eggnog can set you back 500 calories; wine, beer, and mixed drinks range from 150 to 225 calories. If you do drink alcohol, have a glass of water or sparkling water in between drinks, as this will keep you hydrated and may cause you to drink less.

Have a Healthy Holiday Season!

Holiday Homemade Cranberry Sauce

Cranberry Season’s here, and that’s great news
for your gut health, your immunity and more

Cranberries are bitter-tasting berries that are full of powerful phytochemicals that protect your body from illness. These berries are traditionally sweetened and cooked or sweetened and dried to reduce some of their tartness. But you can still eat them raw and find ways to incorporate them into your favorite recipes.

Health Benefits of Cranberries
Can help prevent urinary tract infections. They are loaded with an antioxidant called proanthocyanidins (or PAC’s for short). PAC’s reduce the ability for bacteria to stick to the wall of the urinary tract.

Can improve your digestion. Fiber is amazing for overall gut health. It is important for a healthy digestive system and to maintain regular bowel movements (one cup has about 4.6 grams of fiber). Furthermore, fiber keeps you fuller longer!

Can boost your immune system. If you feel the sniffles coming on, reach for cranberries, just one cup contains 22% or your recommended daily value of vitamin C. Load up to help your body fight back!

How to incorporate cranberries into your diet
• In your smoothies (raw)
• In your morning oatmeal (raw or dried)
• In homemade muffins (raw)
• Toss sliced raw cranberries into a spinach and chicken salad (or dried)
• Homemade cranberry sauce (see recipe below)

Cranberry Sauce with a twist – Makes 2 cups
A homemade alternative to store-bought cranberry sauce with delicious hints of cinnamon and apple to complement the flavor.

Ingredients
• 12 oz fresh cranberries, rinsed
• 1 fresh apple cider
• 1 tsp. orange zest
• 1/4 tsp. cinnamon
• 1/8 tsp. ground cloves
• ½ cup peeled and cored apples, mashed
• ¼ cup of agave nectar or honey

Instructions
1 In a saucepan, bring cider, orange zest, cinnamon and cloves to a boil.
2 Once liquid is boiling, add cranberries and turn heat down to medium. Cook uncovered for about 10 minutes.
3 Add mashed apple and agave nectar or honey, turn off the heat and cool.

Mindfulness at HALLOWEEN

While other people are “scared” by the skeletons, spiders, ghosts, and pranks, Nutritionists are more scared by what traditional Halloween sugary foods are doing inside your kid’s body. Remember, it’s ok to indulge in treats once in while; but don’t forget to practice moderation.

Check out the tips below to help you take the scary out of Halloween’s sugar rush:

1. Focus on experiences: Halloween is supposed to be about the spooky, scary and paranormal, not the sugary, salty and high-in-cholesterol. Enjoy a classic Halloween night with the kids: take them to a haunted house, go on a ghost walk around the city, visit a pumpkin patch and choose the perfect pumpkin to carve, or simply watch a scary movie. These activities were once the quintessential Halloween must-dos — let’s bring them back from the undead.

2. Instead of giving candies and chocolate, pass out other fun items such as glow-sticks, mini bags of (organic) popcorn, or even fun spooky accessories … think vampire teeth, plastic spider rings, or spooky stickers.

3. Wait to buy your candies – buy them the day of to avoid being tempted. Buy less than you think you need to avoid leftovers. You can also buy the ones YOU don’t like, that way you will not be tempted to eat them☺

4. Make sure you have a super healthy dinner before you send your kids trick or treating, they will be less incline to eating candies or chocolate while they are trick or treating.

5. Send your kids with a smaller bag or a small Halloween bucket, that way there will be less to manage.

6. Go through the bag and ration the candies and only allow them sweets on special occasions. You can mix small bits of chocolate with air-popped popcorn, that way they will get less sugar in one bite.

Have fun & be safe!
www.fuel4lifenutrition.com
Ref: Canadian Health Food Association (CHFA), Superlife.

Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

After you’ve had fun carving your pumpkin, save the seeds and make a healthy snack with the pumpkin seeds.

ROASTED PUMPKIN SEEDS
• 1cup raw pumpkin seeds
• 1/4tsp extra virgin olive oil
• Sprinkle of chili powder (you can also add paprika & cumin)
• Sprinkle of sea salt & garlic powder

1. Wash the seeds, toss them with the olive oil and mix well. Add your spices & mix again. You can also change up the spices to your taste!

2. Lay them out on a baking sheet and bake for 8-10 minutes at 350degrees or until golden. Just watch them so they don’t get too brown.

Enjoy!

Carole Woodstock, RHN
www.fuel4lifenutrition.com